Archive for June, 2007

Tired of not being able to save your WSS sites as templates because they exceed the maximum template size?

Written by Cornelius J. van Dyk on . Posted in Annoyances

Well, courtesy of my buddy Todd Klindt, here’s a little unknown STSADM command that you can use to change all that once and for all. The command you need is:

    STSADM –o setproperty –pn max-template-document-size –pv 524288000
The –pv value is the value, in Bytes, that you wish to set the limit to. The maximum value that can be set is 500 MB or 524288000 Bytes. Note: STSADM will crunch away at this command for a while so be patient and PLEASE do NOT terminate STSADM midstream!

Cheers
C




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SharePoint gradual migration “gotcha” to be aware of…

Written by Cornelius J. van Dyk on . Posted in Blog


When installing MOSS 2007 into an existing SPS 2003 environment, you undoubtedly have already decided on a migration strategy i.e. In Place, Database or Gradual. One of the little gotchas to be aware of if you decided to choose the Gradual migration strategy affects pre-existing web applications. If you look at this screen shot:




You will notice the default state of our web server BEFORE in installation and configuration of the Gradual migration. In our case, we have a web application installed on the web server that is leveraged by the portal. As expected, the web application is installed in a virtual directory under the Default Web Site, in this case called SPSWebApp. Furthermore, it shares the web traffic port i.e. port 80, with the Default Web Site, as it should in order for the WEB application to work properly.

After installing MOSS, successfully running through the Config Wizard and commencing a gradual migration, we see the following in the IIS Manager:




As you know, SharePoint will create a web site called “Default Web Site_Pair” for the new MOSS portal. That web site will be assigned port 80. The old “Default Web Site” web site will have a new TCP port assigned to it, the port you specified in the Gradual Upgrade configuration steps. In our case we used port 8000 and as you can see above, port 8000 is where it now sits.

The problem with this is that any and all web applications such as our SPSWebApp that are installed into virtual directories under the Default Web Site also now have a new port under which they run. Since most web application references and code simply reference the URL without any port specification, IIS would default to port 80 on said web application requests. Given that the web application does not exist on port 80 anymore, such requests would fail with 404 errors.

So, be aware of this little gotcha. The way to work through this is to uninstall your web applications before you commence the gradual upgrade, but after the Config Wizard was done. Then once the new port 80 web site was created, reinstall your web applications to the Default Web Site_Pair web site on port 80. That should about do it. 



Cheers
C




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Home sweet home…

Written by Cornelius J. van Dyk on . Posted in Blog

My house from the air… J

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This photo is relatively new… I would say probably 3 years old.

  1. The basketball ½ court.
  2. The huge pine tree on the corner of the house… removed last year.
  3. The old shed, 8×8 in size. I tore it down 2 years ago and rebuilt a 12×12 in its place.
  4. The flower bed I built for my wife, 3 years ago.
  5. The HUGE old, 100 year + silver leaf maple we love!


Cheers
C




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My BIGGEST pet peeve!

Written by Cornelius J. van Dyk on . Posted in Blog

Well, besides idiots clogging up intersections when the light turns red of course… I know this sounds silly, but I just can’t stand it when people don’t know how to SPELL product names. I don’t know why it drives me up the walls, but it does. At my firm, I’m constantly waging a campaign for getting people to spell product names correctly. By spelling I mean, proper spelling with the right letters capitalized! (Told you it sounds silly)

The one that always trips my wire, because it’s my product that I love, is when people spell SharePoint with a lower case “p” as in Sharepoint. Ug, it’s hard for me NOT to correct that last one in my blog! 😉 Here’s a good example I stumbled upon this morning:

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Now this dude is “blogging all things” SharePoint. And it’s not like he DOESN’T know how to spell it either. The arrow points out where he clearly got it right the first time. But then it all just went downhill after that. This guy really doesn’t have ANY consistency to his spelling of SharePoint. At least most people are consistent in using an upper case “S” and a lower case “p”.

So I beg you PLEASE! If you’re going to use product names, not just SharePoint, please, PLEASE spell them properly! 🙂

Ah, it feels good to get that out of my system!



Cheers
C




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